New Rules for Privacy Regulations

The Wall Street Journal has an informative conversation with Lawrence Lessig: Technology Will Create New Models for Privacy Regulation. What underlies a change toward new models are two points: the servers holding vast user databases are increasingly (and very cheaply) breached, and the value of the information in those databases is being transferred to something more aligned to VRM: use of the data, on a need to know basis. Lessig notes:

The average cost per user of a data breach is now $240 … think of businesses looking at that cost and saying “What if I can find a way to not hold that data, but the value of that data?” When we do that, our concept of privacy will be different. Our concept so far is that we should give people control over copies of data. In the future, we will not worry about copies of data, but using data. The paradigm of required use will develop once we have really simple ways to hold data. If I were king, I would say it’s too early. Let’s muddle through the next few years. The costs are costly, but the current model of privacy will not make sense going forward.

The challenge, notes Lessig, is “a corrupt Congress” that is more interested in surveillance than markets and doing business. Perhaps that isn’t a problem, according to an Associated Press poll (which has no bias, of course!):

According to the new poll, 56 percent of Americans favor and 28 percent oppose the ability of the government to conduct surveillance on Internet communications without needing to get a warrant. That includes such surveillance on U.S. citizens. Majorities both of Republicans (67 percent) and Democrats (55 percent) favor government surveillance of Americans’ Internet activities to watch for suspicious activity that might be connected to terrorism. Independents are more divided, with 40 percent in favor and 35 percent opposed. Only a third of Americans under 30, but nearly two-thirds 30 and older, support warrantless surveillance.

Right. After all, who needs business?

Electronic Health Records and Patient-Centric Design

CIO’s story Why Electronic Health Records aren’t more usable offers an interesting perspective on the current (improved?) state of affairs in medical care records. From the article:

The American Medical Association in 2014 issued an eight-point framework for improving EHR usability. According to this framework, EHRs should:

  • enhance physicians’ ability to provide high-quality patient care
  • support team-based care
  • promote care coordination
  • offer product modularity and configurability
  • reduce cognitive workload
  • promote data liquidity
  • facilitate digital and mobile patient engagement
  • expedite user input into product design and post-implementation feedback.

Nevertheless, it does not appear that EHR vendors are placing more emphasis on UCD. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT requires developers to perform usability tests as part of a certification process that makes their EHRs eligible for the government’s EHR incentive program. Yet a recent study found that, of 41 EHR vendors that released public reports, fewer than half used an industry-standard UCD process. Only nine developers tested their products with at least 15 participants who had clinical backgrounds, such as physicians.

Note that this situation is not due to a lack of user-centric efforts to make medical records more useful. Indeed there are several efforts underway, including HealthAuth, Kantara’s Healthcare ID Assurance Working Group, Patient Privacy Rights, HEART working efforts with OAuth and UMA, and more. As the article noted, there are regulatory complications as well as crazy-complicated workflow requirements imposed by the software designers/vendors. We need a shift in focus here.

Volvo’s In-Car Delivery Service

In Volvo launches in-car package delivery service in Gothenburg, Volvo’s new service “lets you have your Christmas shopping delivered directly to your car.” Intriguing idea that saves on parking hassles like those people who are waiting/idling around the favored spots.

With just days to go before Black Friday and Cyber Monday – the busiest online shopping days of the Christmas season – Sweden’s Volvo Cars has unveiled a brand new way to take some of the hassle out Christmas shopping.

The premium car maker has launched the world’s first commercially available in-car delivery service by teaming up with PostNord, the Nordic region’s leading communication and logistics supplier, Lekmer.com, the leading Nordic online toy and baby goods store, and Mat.se, a Swedish online grocery retailer, to have Christmas toys, gifts, food and drinks delivered to its cars. …

The Volvo In-car Delivery works by means of a digital key, which is used to gain one-time access to your vehicle. Owners simply order the goods online, receive a notification that the goods have been delivered and then just drive home with them.

Alas, not available everywhere. Yet.

Personal Information Economy 2015 – London

The Personal Information Economy 2015 conference is coming up! From the event page:

As a new digital age unfolds brands have a make-or-break strategic opportunity to place their customer relationships on a powerful new footing.

The opportunity: to work with customers to create new ‘Me2B’ services that empower them with data and help them use this data to meet previously unmet needs, such as making better decisions and organising and managing their lives better.

Brands that enable these new relationships and services are sustaining and deepening customer trust, growing revenue streams and profits, differentiating themselves in crowded markets, and positioning themselves strategically at the forefront of the digital economy.

Details:

Personal Information Economy 2015: Growth Through Trust
The rise of Me2B commerce
Event Venue:
Kings Place, 90 York Way, London, N1 9AG
Event Date: Tuesday, December 8th 2015 from 09:00 to 19:00 (GMT)
More information here.