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Improving your Web Pal

Google recently made some changes in Chrome that required changes in the Customer Commons Web Pal. Our good friends at Emmett Global have completed most of those changes, which you’ll see in by going into Window -> Extensions, and clicking on the “Enable” box next to “Customer Commons Web Pal.”

The layout on your Web Pal start page (where you are when you open a new page or tab) is still going through some changes. So bear with us as we work those out. We’ll also put up an FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions list) explaining some of the changes and new capabilities.

Meanwhile, stay tuned for some exciting news about what we’ll be doing at Customer Commons over the coming months.

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How free public Wi-Fi networks could be stealing your private data

Think twice before connecting to unknown public hotspots!
F-Secure demonstrates how unsecure free Wi-Fi networks could be a trap to steal your data
Finn Steglich, an IT security consultant, set up a free Wi-Fi hotspot in Canary Wharf and Westminster and monitored traffic as random phone users hooked up to the network on the fly. With the hotspot connected to his laptop, Steglich was able to see all of the users’ unecrypted data and was able to nick their usernames and passwords, giving him access to to their private accounts.
When the dodgy hotspot was positioned outside the Queen Eliabeth II Conference Centre, right next to the Houses of Parliament, it took just ten minutes to gather a handful of unwitting surfers. In half an hour, 250 devices connected to the network, most of them automatically, while 33 active users used the dodgy connection to transmit data.
Read more: http://recombu.com/mobile/news/f-secure-unsecure-wifi-network-security-risk-crime_M20882.html
Posted by Dont Mine on Me

New exhibit showcases art in the digital surveillance era

The Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art’s newly opened Covert Operations is full of projects that not only protest data collection, but sometimes use it to drive their points home.

It’s safe to say that surveillance technology had a profound effect on American culture, even before Edward Snowden’s leaks arrived — there’s a sense that you can never reallyescape the government’s eye. If you’ve ever shared that feeling, you’ll be glad to hear that there’s finally an art exhibition devoted to exploring high-tech monitoring.
Read more:  http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/28/surveillance-art-exhibition/
Posted by Dont Mine on Me

 

Europe to Google: Here’s how we want you to protect user privacy

Consent to allow your personal data to be used would have to be clearly laid out.

Google receives guidelines from European regulators explaining how it can avoid running afoul of privacy laws, reports Reuters.
Europe is now trying to tell Google how best to handle the privacy of its users.
For years, the search giant has been tussling with European privacy regulators over how it collects and stores the data of its users. In 2012, Google got into trouble after it said it planned to revamp its privacy policies to “combine personal information” across its multiple products and services. The company justified the change by saying it would consolidate its 60 different privacy policies into one single policy that would be simpler.
Read more: http://www.cnet.com/news/europe-to-google-heres-how-we-want-you-to-protect-your-users-privacy/
Posted by Dont Mine on Me

Europe to Google: Here’s how we want you to protect user privacy

Consent to allow your personal data to be used would have to be clearly laid out

Europe is now trying to tell Google how best to handle the privacy of its users.
For years, the search giant has been tussling with European privacy regulators over how it collects and stores the data of its users. In 2012, Google got into trouble after it said it planned to revamp its privacy policies to “combine personal information” across its multiple products and services. The company justified the change by saying it would consolidate its 60 different privacy policies into one single policy that would be simpler.
Read more: http://www.cnet.com/news/europe-to-google-heres-how-we-want-you-to-protect-your-users-privacy/
Posted by Dont Mine on Me

Home Depot finally admits to customer data breach

“We apologise to our customers for the inconvenience and anxiety this has caused, and want to reassure them that they will not be liable for fraudulent charges,” said Home Depot chairman and chief executive Frank Blake.
Hacking
US retailer claims malware has been eradicated from system.
US DIY retailer Home Depot has finally admitted to a server breach that led to around 56 million payment card details being stolen, which is thought to be the largest ever retail security breach in history.
In a public statement, the retailer said an investigation into a possible breach, that happened earlier in the month, began immediately after the retailer received reports from its banking partners and law enforcement that criminals may have breached its systems.
Read more: http://www.itpro.co.uk/data-leakage/23153/home-depot-finally-admits-to-customer-data-breach
Posted by Dont Mine on Me

Death to marketing clichés

Here are a few I’ve tweeted just in the last few minutes:

  1. Message to #marketing: There are no “brands I love”. There are lots I like, or respect, but none I love. Why should anybody? Really. #vrm— Doc Searls (@dsearls) September 22, 2014
  2. Message to #marketing: Loyalty programs are coercive. If you want customers to love you, don’t force them to carry a card. Let them go. #vrm — Doc Searls (@dsearls) September 22, 2014
  3. Message to #marketing: Having an interest in some brands doesn’t mean I want tweets, emails or pitches of any kind from any of them. #vrm — Doc Searls (@dsearls) September 22, 2014
  4. #Extranatives: Reference to the future as “going forward,” and the word “experience” when applied to design. Both are crutches & clichés. — Doc Searls (@dsearls) September 22, 2014
  5. Message to #marketers: If you “acquire,” “control,” “manage,” “own” or “lock in” customers, you share lingo with ranchers and slave-holders. — Doc Searls (@dsearls) September 23, 2014
  6. Message to #marketers We are not fish, and advertising is not food: http://t.co/q0A4EIJZeQ #vrm — Doc Searls (@dsearls) September 23, 2014

I just didn’t want to let those go un-blogged.

(On the technical front, I’m also experimenting with the new 4.0 WordPress upgrade. It doesn’t work like I expected with sourced tweets, but it still works better than the last version.)

The Most Enticing Feature a Tech Company Can Offer Now Is Privacy

Apple and others finally realize that Privacy is good business!

Apple’s new privacy policy is built specifically to make it impossible for the company to turn over your data to law enforcement, even with a search warrant.
This isn’t some bleeding-heart benevolence wrought from Tim Cook’s dark night of the soul. It’s a shrewd business move reflecting demands from users, and we’re going to see more like it. The greatest value-add companies like Apple can provide for people right now is privacy.
Read more: http://gizmodo.com/the-most-enticing-feature-a-tech-company-can-offer-now-1636870786

Posted by Dont Mine on Me

A New Gossip Tool That Keeps Fake Tipsters Away, But Guards Anonymity

Let your voice be “Heard”.
Now you can do it anonymously!

Someone just said something on the internet, and you know they’re wrong.

You know because you’re an expert on the subject this bozo is spewing nonsense about. But, at the same time, you don’t want to post a response under your own name. Maybe you have an opinion that would make you unpopular with your family or colleagues. Or maybe you have a stalker and don’t want to tip them off about the sites you use. Regardless of your reasons, you’re left with a choice: either you post anonymously, which means no one will know what your credentials are, or use your real name and risk the real-world consequences.
Read more: http://www.wired.com/2014/09/heard/
Posted by Dont Mine on Me

Android Browser flaw a “privacy disaster” for half of Android users

PRIVACY ALERT!
Potentially any site visited with the Android browser could be stealing sensitive data. It’s a bug that needs fixing, and fast!

A bug quietly reported on September 1 appears to have grave implications for Android users. Android Browser, the open source, WebKit-based browser that used to be part of the Android Open Source Platform (AOSP), has a flaw that enables malicious sites to inject JavaScript into other sites. Those malicious JavaScripts can in turn read cookies and password fields, submit forms, grab keyboard input, or do practically anything else.
Read more: http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/09/android-browser-flaw-a-privacy-disaster-for-half-of-android-users/
Posted by Dont Mine on Me

Tim Cook to discuss Apple Watch privacy concerns in the wake of iCloud scandal

Apple watch looks great, but will it protect your personal data?
apple watch hands on 7
Connecticut Attorney State General George Jepsen has called Apple CEO Tim Cook to a meeting, where the new Apple Watch will be the topic of conversation. No, Jepson isn’t hoping to score an early model (so far as we know), but wants to grill Cook over how our privacy will be protected when using the Watch to collect health and location data.
Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/apple-watch-privacy-worries
Posted by Dont Mine on Me