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Is the Internet of Things putting your child’s privacy at risk?

What are the potential risks for child protection, and what needs to be put in place to mitigate against these?
Barbie’s Hello Dreamhouse is displayed at Toy Fair in New York. The smart home connects to the internet and a companion app.
From Hello Barbie to hacked baby monitors, privacy legislation can’t keep up with the increasingly Wi-Fi enabled world.
Just as we are connecting everyday objects, such as cameras, heating systems and fridge freezers to the internet, we are also connecting dolls, toys and other items that are accessed by children.
Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/feb/29/is-the-internet-of-things-putting-your-childs-privacy-at-risk
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Apple’s next move in its privacy fight against the FBI

The U.S. government could fine the company for every day it doesn’t comply. Apple has close to $200 billion in cash lying around, so it has lots of money to burn on this fight!
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If Apple complies with the judge’s order, it will be forced to build software that “would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said in a public letter to customers.
Read more: http://money.cnn.com/2016/02/18/technology/apple-fbi-fight/index.html?section=money_news_international
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US intelligence chief: we might use the internet of things to spy on you

“In the future, intelligence services might use the [internet of things] for identification, surveillance, monitoring, location tracking, and targeting for recruitment, or to gain access to networks or user credentials,” James Clapper said.
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The US intelligence chief has acknowledged for the first time that agencies might use a new generation of smart household devices to increase their surveillance capabilities.
As increasing numbers of devices connect to the internet and to one another, the so-called internet of things promises consumers increased convenience – the remotely operated thermostat from Google-owned Nest is a leading example. But as home computing migrates away from the laptop, the tablet and the smartphone, experts warn that the security features on the coming wave of automobiles, dishwashers and alarm systems lag far behind.
Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/feb/09/internet-of-things-smart-home-devices-government-surveillance-james-clapper

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How to lock down your Facebook privacy settings

Chances are, you’ve got a Facebook account – but do you know which parts of it are private and which parts are open for all to see?

Chances are, you’ve got a Facebook account – but do you know which parts of it are private and which parts are open for all to see? Understanding the various visibility rules for your posts can be confusing but we’re here to explain everything in simple terms.
Read more: http://www.t3.com/news/how-to-lock-down-your-facebook-privacy-settings
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Will the new Safe Harbour deal really protect your data?

Keep in mind that this new Safe Harbour will almost certainly be challenged by civil liberties groups pretty much immediately.
EU flag
The EU and US have reached a last-minute deal to ensure companies can transfer European data to American soil.
The new agreement provides guarantees that personal data from the EU will receive adequate protection when processed by US firms, and replaces a defunct deal that around 4,000 businesses relied on.
Read more: http://www.itpro.co.uk/data-protection/25978/will-the-new-safe-harbour-deal-really-protect-your-data
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LATEST SNOWDEN REVELATION SHOWS NSA HACKED INTO ISRAELI DRONE CAMERAS

The NSA was built to spy, with the uncomfortable question being “on whom?”
Heron Drone
The NSA was built to spy, with the uncomfortable question being “on whom?” The agency, long a background player in paranoid cinema like 1998’s Enemy of the State, re-entered the public consciousness in 2013 in a big way with revelations from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden that the vast surveillance architecture of the NSA was spying on American citizens. Since then, there have been many more revelations from the documents Snowden lifted when he fled the agency and the country.
Read more: http://www.popsci.com/latest-snowden-revelation-shows-nsa-hacked-into-israeli-drone-cameras
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Privacy is an Inside Job

The Searls Wanigan, 1949

Ordinary people wearing and enjoying the world’s original privacy technology: clothing and shelter. (I’m the one on top. Still had hair then.)

Start here: clothing and shelter are privacy technologies. We use them to create secluded spaces for ourselves. Spaces we control.

Our ancestors have been wearing clothing for at least 170,000 years and building shelters for at least half a million years. So we’ve had some time to work out what privacy means. Yes, it differs among cultures and settings, but on the whole it is well understood and not very controversial.

On the Internet we’ve had about 21 years*. That’s not enough time to catch up with the physical world, but hey: it’s still early.

It helps to remember that nature in the physical world doesn’t come with privacy. We have to make our own. Same goes for the networked world. And, since most of us don’t yet have clothing and shelter in the networked world, we’re naked there.

So, since others exploit our exposure — and we don’t like it — privacy on the Internet is very controversial. Evidence: searching for “privacy” brings up 4,670,000,000 results. Most of the top results are for groups active in the privacy cause, and for well-linked writings on the topic. But most of the billions of results below that are privacy policies uttered in print by lawyers for companies and published because that’s pro forma.

Most of those companies reserve the right to change their policies whenever they wish, by the way, meaning they’re meaningless.

For real privacy, we can’t depend on anybody else’s policies, public or private. We can’t wait for Privacy as a Service. We can’t wait for our abusers to get the clues and start respecting personal spaces we’ve hardly begun to mark out (even though they ought to be obvious). And we can’t wait for the world’s regulators to start smacking our abusers around (which, while satisfying, won’t solve the problem).

We need to work with the knitters and builders already on the case in the networked world, and recruit more to help out. Their job is to make privacy policies technologies we wear, we inhabit, we choose, and we use to signal what’s okay and not okay to others.

The EFF has been all over this for years. So have many developers on the VRM list. (Those are ones I pay the most attention to. Weigh in with others and I’ll add them here.)

The most widely used personal privacy technology today is ad and tracking blockingMore than 200 million of us now employ those on our browsers. The tools are many and different, but basically they all block ads and/or tracking at our digital doorstep. In sum this amounts to the largest boycott in human history.

But there’s still no house behind the doorstep, and we’re still standing there naked, even if we’ve kept others from planting tracking beacons on us.

One of the forms privacy takes in the physical world is the mutual understanding we call manners, which are agreements about how to respect each others’ intentions.

Here at Customer Commons, we’ve been working on terms we can assert, to signal those intentions. Here’s a working draft of what they look like now:

UserSubmittedTerms1stDraft

That’s at the Consent and Information Working Group. Another allied effort is Consent Receipt.

If you’re working on privacy in any way — whether you’re a geek hacking code, a policy maker, an academic, a marketer trying to do the right thing, or a journalist working the privacy beat — remember this: Privacy is personal first. Before anything elseIf you’re not working on getting people clothing and shelter of their own, you’re not helping where it’s needed.

It’s time to civilize the Net. And that’s an inside job.

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*If we start from the dawn of ISPs, graphical browsers, email and the first commercial activity, which began after the NSFnet went down on 30 April 1995.

 

 

 

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London startup unveils app encryption service hosted in the cloud

The company claims to be the first to combine strong end-to-end encryption with cloud-based app development from the ground up!
Qredo embraces strong encryption to bulk up application security
London-based startup Qredo has announced the beta launch of an app encryption development platform hosted in the cloud, in an effort to make it easier for firms of all types to add high-level security to their apps.
The company claims to be the first to combine strong end-to-end encryption with cloud-based app development from the ground up, and describes the Qredo SDK as the next step in app security.
Read more: http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2443198/london-startup-unveils-app-encryption-service-hosted-in-the-cloud
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WhatsApp is going to start sharing your personal data with Facebook

WhatsApp might soon start sharing your personal data with Facebook.
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a conveniently hidden option in the latest WhatsApp for Android beta suggests that the service will soon share user data with the social network “to improve [your] Facebook experiences”.
Read more: http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2443057/whatsapp-is-going-to-start-sharing-your-personal-data-with-facebook
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